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Full text of "Constraints on the Geometry of the VHE Emission in LS 5039 from Photon-Photon Deabsorption"

Accepted for publication in Astroparticle Physics 



Constraints on the Geometry of the VHE Emission in LS 5039 
from Photon-Photon Deabsorption 

Markus Bottcher 1 
ABSTRACT 

Evidence for orbital modulation of the very high energy (VHE) 7-ray emission 
from the high-mass X-ray binary and microquasar LS 5039 has recently been 
reported by the HESS collaboration. The observed flux modulation was found to 
go in tandem with a change in the GeV - TeV spectral shape, which may partially 
be a result of 77 absorption in the intense radiation field of the massive companion 
star. However, it was suggested that 77 absorption effects alone can not be the 
only cause of the observed spectral variability since the flux at ~ 200 GeV, which 
is near the minimum of the expected 77 absorption trough, remained essentially 
unchanged between superior and inferior conjunction of the binary system. In 
this paper, a detailed parameter study of the 77 absorption effects in this system 
is presented. For a range of plausible locations of the VHE 7-ray emission region 
and the allowable range of viewing angles, the de-absorbed, intrinsic VHE 7- 
ray spectra and total VHE photon fluxes and luminosities are calculated and 
compared to luminosity constraints based on Bondi-Hoyle limited wind accretion 
onto the compact object in LS 5039. Based on these arguments, it is found that 

(1) it is impossible to choose the viewing angle and location of the VHE emission 
region in a way that the intrinsic (deabsorbed) fluxes and spectra in superior and 
inferior conjunction are identical; consequently, the intrinsic VHE luminosities 
and spectral shapes must be fundamentally different in different orbital phases, 

(2) if the VHE luminosity is limited by wind accretion from the companion star 
and the system is viewed at an inclination angle of i > 40°, the emission is 
most likely beamed by a larger Doppler factor than inferred from the dynamics 
of the large-scale radio outflows, (3) the still poorly constrained viewing angle 
between the line of sight and the jet axis is most likely substantially smaller 
than the maximum of ~ 64° inferred from the lack of eclipses. (4) Consequently, 



1 Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701, 
USA 



-2- 



the compact object is more likely to be a black hole rather than a neutron star. 
(5) There is a limited range of allowed configurations for which the expected 
VHE neutrino flux would actually anti-correlate with the observed VHE 7-ray 
emission. If hadronic models for the 7-ray production in LS 5039 apply, a solid 
detection of the expected VHE neutrino flux and its orbital modulation with km 3 
scale water-Cherenkov neutrino detectors might require the accumulation of data 
over more than 3 years. 

Subject headings: gamma-rays: theory — radiation mechanisms: non-thermal - 
X-rays: binaries — stars: winds, outflows 



Introduction 



The recent detections of VHE (E > 250 GeV) 7-rays from the high-mass X-ray binary 
jet sources LS 5039 with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS: lAharonian et al.ll2005l ) 
and LS I +63°303 with the Major Atmospheric Gamma- Ray Imaging Cherenkov Telescope 
(MAGIC lAlbert et al.ll2006l ) establish these sources (termed "microquasars" if they are accre- 
tion powered) as a new class of 7-ray emitting sources. These results con firm the earlier tent a- 



tive identification of LS 5039 with the EGRET source 3EG J1824-1514 (Paredes et al 



2000) 



and LSI 61°303 with the COS B source 2CG 135 +01 fl&egorv fe Tavlorl ll978l: iTavlor et al. 



1992|) and the EGRET source 3EG J0241+6103 feniffen et al.lll997f ). Both of these objects 
show evidence for variability of the VHE emission, suggesting an association with the orbital 
period of the binary system. In the case of LS I +63°303, the association with the orbital 
period is not yet firmly established since the MAGIC obse rvations covered only a few orbital 
periods, and the orbital period (P = 26.5 d: lGregoryll2002l ) is very close to the si derial period 



of th e moon, which also sets a natural windowing period for VHE observations (lAlbert et al. 



20061 ). In contrast, the HESS observations of LS 5039 provide rather unambiguous evidence 
for an orbital modul ation of both the VHE 7 -ray flux and spectral shape w i th the orbital 
period of P = 3.9 d (lAharonian et al.ll2006bl ). Specifically, lAharonian et all (j2006bl ) found 
that between inferior conjunction (i.e., the compact object being located in front of the com- 
panion star), the VHE 7-ray spectrum could be well fitted with an exponentially cut-off, 
hard power-law of the form <3>£ oc E~ 185 e~ E l Ea whith a cut-off energy of Eq = 8.7 TeV. In 
contrast, the VHE spectrum at superior conjunction is well represented by a pure power-law 
($e oc E~ 2 - 53 ) with a much steeper slope , but id entical differential flux at E norm « 200 GeV. 
The original data from lAharonian et al.l (J2006bj), together with these spectral fit functions, 
are shown in Fig. [TJ 



A variety of different models for the high-energy emission from high-mass X- 



- 3- 



ray binaries have been suggested 

(e.g., 



Bednarek 


1997 




2000: 



These range from high-energy processes in neu- 



Moskalenko et al. 



1993 



Chernyakova. Neronov. fe Walter 



Moskalenko fc Karakulal Il994 ; 
20061 : bubusl l2006bh . via mod- 



els with t 
sites (e.g. 


le inner regions of microquasar jets being t 


le primary high-energy emission 


Romero et al. 2C 


03l; Bosch-Ramon & Parec 




200^ 


; Bosch-Ramon e 


al. 2005a: 


Gupta, Bottcher. & Dermer 


12006; Dermer & Bottcher 


2006: 


Gupta & Bottcher 


2006) and 


interactions of microquasar jets with the ISM (Bosch- Ramon et al. 2005b), to models in- 



volvi ng particle acceleration in shocks produced by colliding stellar winds (e.g.. lReimer et al. 



20061 ). In addition to involving a variety of different leptonic and hadronic emission processes, 
these models also imply vastly different locations of the 7-ray production site with respect to 
the compact object in LS 5039 and the companion star. However, independent of the emis- 
sion mechanism responsible for the VHE 7-rays, the intense radiation field of the high-mass 
(stellar type 06.5V) companion will lead to 77 absorption of VHE 7-rays in the ~ 100 GeV - 
TeV photon energy range. The characteristic features of the 77 absorpti on of VHE 7-rays by 
the co mpa nion sta r light i n LS 5039 have been investigated in detail by lBottcher fc Dermer 
( 120051 ) and iDubud (j2006al ). It was found that, if the 7-ray emission originates within a dis- 
tance of the order of the orbital separation of the binary system (s ~ 2 x 10 12 cm), this effect 
should lead to a pronounced 77 absorption trough, in particular near superior conjunction, 
while 77 absorption tends to be almost negligible near inferior conjunction. In LS 5039, the 
minimum of the absorption trough is expected to be located around E m i n ~ 300 GeV and 
should shift from higher to lower energies as the orientation of the binary system changes 
from inferior to superior conjunction. 

Most of the relevant parameters of LS 5039, except for the inclination angle % of the line 
of sight with respect to the normal to the orbital plane, are rather well determined (see §2]). 
This allows for a detailed parameter study of the 77 absorption effects, leaving the inclination 
angle and the distance of the VHE emission site from the compact object as free parameters. 
As will be shown in §3J the effect of electromagnetic cascades will lead to a re-deposition of 
the absorbed > 100 GeV luminosity almost entirely at photon energies E < 100 GeV. For 
that reason, one can easily correct for the 77 absorption effect at energies E > 100 GeV 
by multiplying the observed fluxes by a factor e Tll<yES) (where t 77 (-E) is the 77 absorption 
depth along the line of sight) in order to find the intrinsic, deabsorbed VHE spectra for any 
given choice of i and the height zq of the VHE 7-ray emission site above the compact object. 
Results of this procedure will be presented in $U 111 $E these results will then be used to 
estimate the total flux and luminosity in VHE 7-rays, which can be compared to limits on 
the available power under the assumption that the VHE emission is powered by Bondi-Hoyle 
limited wind accretion onto the compact object. This leads to important constraints on the 
location of the VHE emision site and the geometry of the system, which will be discussed in 



-4- 



2. Parameters of the LS 5039 System 



LS 5039 is a high-mass X-ray binary in which a compact object is in orbit around 
an 06.5V type stellar companion with a mass of M* = 23 M , a bolometric luminosity of 
= 10 5 ' 3 L pa 7 x 10 38 ergs s _1 and an effective surface temperature of T e g = 39, 000 °K. 
The mass function of the system is f(M) = (M C . Q . sin if/(M c . Q . + M*) 2 k5x 1O~ 3 M . 
The binary orbit has an eccentricity of e = 0.35 and an orbital period of P = 3.9 d. 
The inclination angle % is only poorly constrained in the range 13° < i < 64°. Under 
the assumption of co-rotation of the star with the orbital motion, a preferred inclination 
angle of i = 25° cou ld be inferred, leading to a compact-object mass of M C . Q . = 3.7~^{qM q 



(ICasares et al.ll2005l ). However, since there is no clear evidence for co- rotation, the inclination 
angle is left as a free parameter in this analysis. Within the entire range of allowed values, 
13° < % < 64°, the mass of the compact object is substantially smaller than the mass of the 
companion, so that the orbit can very well be approximated by a stationary companion star, 
orbited by the compact object for our purposes. The orbit has a semimajor axis of length 
a = 2.3 x 10 12 cm, and the projection of the line of si ght onto the orbital plan e forms an angle 
of ~ 45° with the semimajor axis (see, e.g., Fig. 4 of lAharonian et al.ll2006bl ). Consequently, 
the orbital separation at superior conjunction is found to be s s c . = 1.6 x 10 12 cm, while at 
inferior conjunction, it is Sj. c . = 2.7 x 10 12 cm. 

The mass outflow rate in the stellar wind of the companion has be en determined as 
MwinH ~ !O~ 6 ' 3 M /yr, and the terminal wind speed is ~ 2500 km s _1 (IMcSwain fc Gies 



20021 1. EVN and MERLIN observations of the radio jets of LS 5039 sugges t a mildly rel- 
ativis tic flow speed of (3 ~ 0.2 on the length scale of several hundred AU (IParedes et al. 
20021 ). This would correspond to a bulk Lorentz factor of the flow of V « 1.02. However, it 



is plausible to assume that near the base of the jet, where the VHE 7-ray emission may arise 
(according to some of the currently most actively discussed modeles), the flow may have a 
substantially higher speed. Therefore, we will also consider bulk flow speeds of V ~ 2, more 
typical of the jet speeds of other Galactic microquasar jets. 



For the analysis in th is paper, we use a s ource distance of d 
to 4vrd 2 = 7.1 x 10 44 cm 2 jCasares et aDl2005h . 



2.5 kpc, corresponding 



Inferred compact object masses and Doppler boosting factors D — (T[l — /3 cosi]) 1 for 
representative values of i — 20°, 40°, and 60° and T = 1.02 and T = 2 are listed in Tabled! 



- 5 - 



3. The Role of Electromagnetic Cascades 

The absorption of VHE 7-ray photons photons will lead to the production of relativis- 
tic electron-positron pairs, which will lose energy via synchrotron radiation and inverse- 
Compton scattering on starlight photons, and initiate synchrotron or inverse- Compton sup- 
ported electromagnetic cascades. For photon energies of E 1 > 100 GeV, the produced 
pairs will have Lorentz factors of 7 > 10 5 . Given the surface temperature of the com- 
panion star of T e fj = 39, 000 K, starlight photons have a characteristic photon energy of 
e* = /iz/*/(m e c 2 ) ~ 7 x 10~ 6 , electrons and positrons with energies of 7 > 1/e* ~ 1.5 x 10 5 
will interact with these star light photons in the Klein-Nishina limit and, thus, very ineffi- 
ciently 7-rays produced through upscattering of star light photons by secondary electrons 
and positrons in the Thomson regime will have energies of E\c < E^f x = m e c 2 /e* ~ 75 GeV. 

In addition to Compton scattering, secondary electron-positron pairs will suffer syn- 
chrotron losses. Magnetic fields even near the base of microquasar jets are unlikely to exceed 
B ~ 10 3 G. Consequently, along essentially the entire trajectory of VHE photons one may 
safely assume B = 10 3 B3 G with B 3 < 1. Secondary electrons and positrons traveling 
through such magnetic fields will produce synchrotron photons of characteristic energies 
E sy ~ 1.2 x -6375 GeV, where 76 = 7/IO 6 parametrizes the secondary electron's/positron's 
energy. Thus, even for extreme magnetic-field values of B = 10 3 G, synchrotron photons 
at energies > 100 GeV could only be produced by secondary pairs with 7 > 10 7 , resulting 
from primary 7-ray photons of E 1 > 10 TeV, where only a negligible portion of the total 
luminosity from LS 5039 is expected to be liberated. Consequently, electromagnetic cascades 
initiated by the secondary electrons and positrons from 77 absorption in the stellar photon 
field will re-emit the absorbed VHE 7-ray photon energy essentially entirely at photon en- 
ergies < 100 GeV. This conclusion is fully consistent with the more detailed consideration 
of the pair cascades res ulting from 77 absorption of the VHE emission from LS 5039 by 



Aharonian et al.l (j2006al ). 



As demonstrated in lBottcher fc Dermerl (120051 ). 7Z absorption in the stellar wind of the 



companion as well as 77 absorption on star light photons reprocessed in the stellar wind are 
negligible compared to the direct 77 absorption effect for LS 5039. 

Consequently, the only relevant effect modifying the VHE 7-ray spectrum of LS 5039 
at energies above ~ 100 GeV between the emission site and the observer on Earth is 77 
absorption by direct star light photons. This effect can easily be corrected for by multiplying 
the observed spectra by a factor e T77< ^, where t 77 (E) is the 77 absorption depth along the 
line of sight. 



- 6- 



4. Deabsorbed VHE 7-ray spectra 

In this section, we present a parameter study of the deabsorbed photon spectra and 
integrated VHE 7-ray fluxes for representative values of the viewing angle of i = 20°, 40°, 
and 60° and a range of locations of the emission site, characterized by a height z Q above 
the compact object in the direction perpendicular to the orbital pla ne. The absorption 



depth r Tr (E) along the line of sight is evaluated as described in detail in lBottcher fc Dermer 



( 120051 ) . The observed spectra are represented by the best-fit functional forms quoted in the 



introduction. 

Figures [2] — H] show the inferred intrinsic, deabsorbed VHE 7-ray spectra from LS 5039 
for a range of 10 12 cm < zq < 1.5 x 10 13 cm. At larger distances from the compact object, 
77 absorption due to the stellar radiation field becomes negligible for all inclination angles. 
Furthermore, models which assume a distance greatly in excess of the characteristic orbital 
separation (i.e., Zq > 10 13 cm) may be hard to reconcile with the periodic modulation of the 
emission on the orbital time scale since the 7-ray production site would be distributed over a 
large volume, with primary energy input episodes from different orbital phases overlapping 
and thus smearing out the original orbital modulation. As the height zq approaches values 
of the order of the characteristic orbital separation, s~2x 10 12 cm, the intrinsic spectra 
would have to exhibit a significant excess towards the threshold of the HESS observations 
at .Ethr ~ 200 GeV i n order to compensate for the 77 absorption trough with its extremum 



around ~ 300 GeV (IBottcher fc Dermerl 120051 ). At even smaller distances from the compact 
object, zo <C 10 12 cm, the absorption features would again become essentially independent 
of Zq since the overall geometry would not change significantly anymore with a change of Zq. 

A first, important conclusion from Figures [2] - 0] is that there is no combination of i 
and Zo for which the de-absorbed VHE 7-ray spectra in the inferior and superior conjunction 
could be identical. Thus, the intrinsic VHE 7-ray spectra must be fundamentally different 
in the different orbital phases corresponding to superior conjunction (near periastron) and 
inferior conjunction (closer to apastron). 

Second, there is a large range of instances in which the deabsorbed, differential photon 
fluxes at 200 GeV < E < 10 TeV during superior conjunction would have to be substan- 
tially higher than during inferior conjunction, opposite to the observed trend. This could 
have interesting consequences for strategies of searches for high-energy neutrinos. To a first 
approximation, the intrinsic, unabs orbed VHE 7-ray flux is roughly equal to the expected 



high-energy neutrino flux (see, e.g.. iLiparil 120061 ) . Therefore, our results suggest that phases 



with lower observed VHE 7-ray fluxes from LS 5039 may actually coincide with phases of 
larger neutrino fluxes. This is confirmed by a plot of the integrated 0.2 - 10 TeV photon fluxes 
as a function of height of the emission region as shown in Figure An anti-correlation of the 



- 7- 



VHE neutrino and 7-ray fluxes would require emission region heights of z$ < 2.5 x 10 cm 
(i = 20°), 4 x 10 12 cm (i = 40°), and 7 x 10 12 cm (i = 60°), respectively. As we will see in 
the next section, for i = 60°, these configurations can be ruled out because of constraints on 
the available power from wind accretion onto the compact object. 

The possibility of a neutrino-to-photon flux r atio largely exceed i ng on e has also recently 
been discussed for the case of LSI +61°303 by [Torres fc Halzenl (120061 ). Those authors 
also compared the existing AMANDA upper limits to the MAGIC VHE 7-ray fluxes of 
that source. They find that a neutrino-to-photon flux ratio up to ~ 10 for a 77 absorption 
modulated photon signal would still be consistent with the upper limits on the VHE neutrino 
flux from that source. 

In order to assess the observational prospects of detecting VHE neutrinos with the new 
generation of km 3 neutrino detectors, such as ANTARES, NEMO, or KM3Net, one can 
estimate the expected neutrino flux assuming a c haracteristic ratio of produced neutrinos to 
unabsorbed VHE photons at the source of ~ 1 (ILiparil 120061 ) . Under this assumption, the 
resulting neutrino fluxes should be comparable to the deabsorbed photon fluxes plotted in 
Figures As a representative example of the sensitivity of km 3 water-Cherenkov neutrino 
detectors, those figures also contain the anticipated sensitivity limits of the NEMO detector 
for a steady point source with a pow er-law of neutrin o number spectral index 2.5 for 1 and 
3 years of data taking, respectively (iDistefand 120061 ) . Given the likely orbital modulation 
of the neutrino flux of LS 5039, our results indicate that neutrino data accumulated over 
substantially longer than 3 years might be required in order to obtain a firm detection of the 
neutrino signal from LS 5039 and its orbital modulation. 



5. Constraints from Accretion Power Limits 

The inferred intrinsic (deabsorbed) VHE 7-ray fluxes calculated in the previous section 
imply apparent isotropic 0.1-10 TeV luminosities in the range of ~ 2 x 10 34 - 7 x 10 34 ergs/s 
(i = 20°), ~ 1.3 x 10 34 - 7x 10 35 ergs/s (i = 40°), and ~ 1.2 x 10 34 - > 10 37 ergs/s (i = 60°), 
respectively, for emission regions located at zq > 10 12 cm (see Figures [6] and [7]). These should 
be confronted with constraints on the available power from wind accretion from the stellar 
companion onto the compact object. 

For this purpose, we assume that for a given directed wind velocity of iWd ~ 
2.5 x 10 8 cm/s, all matter with (l/2)?;^ ind < GM CmQ J Rbu will be accreted onto the 
compact object. An absolute maximum on the available power is then set by L max « 
(1/12) M wind c 2 (i?| H /[4s 2 ]). We furthermore allow for Doppler boosting of this accretion 



- 8- 



power along the microquasar jet with the Doppler boosting factors D listed in Table [TJ This 
yields an available power corresponding to an inferred, apparent isotropic luminosity of 

„ 2 . 8 x io33 (^) 2 D < (j^y ( 2 . 5 ;^c m /s )" 4 ergs/s - (i) 

The resulting luminosity limits are also included in Table [1] and indicateded by the hor- 
izontal lines in Figures [6] and [7] for F = 1.02 and T = 2, respectively. Allowed configurations 
are those for which the inferred, apparent isotropic 0.1-10 TeV luminosity is substantially 
below the respective luminosity limit. 

Additional restrictions come from the inferred luminosity of the EGRET source 
3EG J1824-1514 whose 90 % confidence contour includes the location of LS 5039 



(lAharonian et al.ll2005l ). The observed > 100 MeV 7-ray flux from this source corresponds 
to an inferred isotropic luminosity of Legret ~ 7 x 10 34 ergs s -1 . This level is also indicated 
in Figures [6] and [7J However, the association of the EGRET source with LS 5039 is uncer- 
tain since the 90 % confidence contour also contains the pulsar PSR B1822-14 as a possible 
counterpart. Thus, even if the available power according to eq. [JJ is lower than Legret, this 
would not provide a significant problem since the EGRET flux could be provided by the 
nearby pulsar. However, the EGRET flux does provide an upper l imit on the ~ 30 MeV 



- 30 GeV flux from LS 5039. As shown in lAharonian et all fl2006ah . the bulk of the VHE 



7-ray flux that is absorbed by 77 absorption on companion star photons and initiates pair 
cascades, will be re-deposited in 7-rays in the EGRET energy range. Thus, any scenario 
that requires an unabsorbed source luminosity in excess of the EGRET luminosity would be 
very problematic. The resulting limits inferred from both eq. [1] and the EGRET flux on the 
height Zq are summarized in Table [2j 

The figure indicates that for i = 20°, virtually all configurations are allowed, even if the 
emission is essentially unboosted (r = 1.02) and originates very close to the compact object. 

For i = 40° at the time of superior conjunction, one can set a limit of zq > 1.7 x 10 12 cm. 
For this viewing angle at inferior conjunction, the limit implied for V = 1.02 is always below 
the inferred value, indicating that this configuration is ruled out. This implies that, if i ~ 40°, 
the emission at the time of inferior conjunction must be substantially Doppler enhanced. 

The situation is even more extreme for % = 60°. Under this viewing angle, only the 
T = 1.02 scenario leads to an allowed model and requires Zq > 5 x 10 12 cm. Since there is 
no allowed scenario to produce the observed flux at inferior conjunction, one can conclude 
that a large inclination angle of i ~ 60° may be ruled out. 

Note, however, that there are alternative models for the very-high-energy emission from 



- 9- 



X-ray binaries in which the source of power for the high-energy emission lies in the rota- 



tional energy of the compact ob 



ect (i n that case, most plausibly a neutron star, see, e.g. 



Chernyakova. Neronov. fc Walter! 120061 ). The constraints discussed above will obviously not 
apply to such models. Instead, in the case of a rotation-powered pulsar wind/jet, one can 
estimate the total available power as 

L Iot ~ jjvr 2 MR 2 ~ 4.4 ■ 10 37 ^ ergs s"\ (2) 

where a 1.4 M & neutron star with R = 10 km is assumed and the spin-down rate and spin 
period are parametrized as P = 10~ 15 P_i5 and P = 10P_2 ms, respectively. Consequently, 
the power requirements of even the extreme scenarios for i = 60°, as discussed above, could, 
in principle, be met by a rotation-powered pulsar. However, such a luminosity could only be 
sustained over a spin-down time of 

t sd ~3x 10 5 years (3) 
and should therefore be rare. 



6. Summary and Discussion 

In this paper, a detailed study of the intrinsic VHE 7-ray emission from the Galactic 
microquasar LS 5039 after correction for 77 absorption by star light photons from the massive 
companion star is presented. This system had shown evidence for an orbital modulation of 
the VHE 7-ray flux and spectral shape. A range of observationally allowed inclination angles, 
13° < i < 64° (specifically, i = 20°, i = 40°, and i = 60°) as well as plausible distances zo of 
the VHE 7-ray emission region above the compact object (10 12 cm < Zq < 1.5 x 10 13 cm) was 
explored. Deabsorbed, intrinsic VHE 7-ray spectra as well as integrated fluxes and inferred, 
apparent isotropic luminosities were calculated and contrasted with constraints from the 
available power from wind accretion from the massive companion onto the compact object. 
The main results are: 

• It is impossible to choose the viewing angle and location of the VHE emission region 
in a way that the intrinsic (deabsorbed) fluxes and spectra in superior and inferior 
conjunction are identical within the range of values of i and zq considered here. For 
values of Zq much smaller and much larger than the characteristic orbital separation 



-10- 



(s ~ 2 x 10 12 cm), the absorption features would become virtually independent of z . 
Furthermore, models assuming a VHE 7-ray emission site at a distance greatly in excess 
of the orbital separation might be difficult to reconcile with the orbital modulation of 
the VHE emission. Consequently, the intrinsic VHE luminosities and spectral shapes 
must be fundamentally different in different orbital phases. 

It was found that the luminosity constraints for an inclination angle of % = 60° at 
inferior conjunction could not be satisfied at all, and for i = 40°, there is no allowed 
configuration in agreement with the luminosity constraint for T = 1.02. From this, it 
may be concluded that, if the VHE luminosity is limited by wind accretion from the 
companion star and the system is viewed at an inclination angle of i > 40°, the emission 
is most likely beamed by a larger Doppler factor than inferred from the dynamics of 
the large-scale radio outflows on scales of several hundred AU. 

Since it was found to be impossible to satisfy the luminosity constraint for inferior 
conjunction at a viewing angle of i = 60°, one can constrain the viewing angle to 
values substantially smaller than the maximum of ~ 64° inferred from the lack of 
eclipses. 

The previous two points as well as the fact that the luminosity limits can easily be 
satisfied for i = 20°, indicate that a rather small incl ination angle i ~ 20 ° may be 



preferred. Thus, our results confirm the conjecture of ICasares et al.l (120051 ) that the 



compact object might be a black hole rather than a neutron star. 

Under the assumption of a photon-to- neutrino ratio of ~ 1 (before 77 absorption), the 
detection of the neutrino flux from LS 5039 and its orbital modulation might require 
the accumulation of data over more than 3 years with km 3 scale neutrino detectors like 
ANTARES, NEMO, or KM3Net. 

Comparing the ranges of allowed configurations from Table [2] to the plot of intrinsic 
VHE fluxes in Figure O one can see that there is a limited range of allowed configura- 
tions for which the expected VHE neutrino flux would actually anti-correlate with the 
observed VHE 7-ray emission. Specifically, for a preferred viewing angle of i ~ 20°, 
models in which the emission originates within z ^ 2.5 x 10 12 cm would predict that 
the VHE neutrino flux at superior conjunction is larger than at inferior conjunction, 
opposite to the orbital modulation trend seen in VHE 7-ray photons. Thus, strategies 
for the identification of high-energy neutrinos from microquasars based on a positive 
correlation with observed VHE fluxes may fail if models with zq < 2.5 x 10 12 cm apply. 

The luminosity limitations discussed above could, in principle, be overcome by a 
rotation-powered pulsar. However, this would require a rather short spin-down time 



- 11 - 



scale of t s d < 10 6 yr. Consequently, such objects should be rare. 



The author thanks F. Aharonian and V. Bosch-Ramon for stimulating discussions and 
hospitality during a visit at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, and M. De Nau- 
rois for providing the HESS data points. I also thank the referee for very insightful and 
constructive comments, which have greatly helped to improve this manuscript. This work 
was partially supported by NASA INGEGRAL Theory grant no. NNG 05GP69G and a 
scholarship at the Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg. 



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This preprint was prepared with the AAS IATgX macros v5.2. 



13 



10- U F 



i 

gf 10 



fa 

# 

fa 



12 



10 



13 



10 



T 



Inferior Conjunction 



Superior Conjunction 




10 



10 



E [GeV] 



Fig. 1. — VHE 7-ray spe ctra of LS 5039 around superior (blue triangles) and inferior (red 
circles) conjunction (from lAharonian et al.ll2006bl ). The curves indicate the best-fit straight 
power-law (superior) and exponentially cut-off power-law (inferior) representations of the 
spectra, on which the analysis in this paper is based. 



Table 1. Inferred parameters of the LS 5039 system for three representative values of the 

inclination angle. 



i [°] 


position 


Af c .o. [Mq] 


D(T = 1.02) 


D(T = 2) 


££°ax(r = 1-02) [crg/s] 


££°ax(r = 2) [erg/s] 


20 


i.e. 


4.5 


1.21 


2.68 


6.7 x 10 :i4 


1.6 x 10 36 


20 


s.c. 


4.5 


1.21 


2.68 


1.9 x 10 35 


4.6 x 10 36 


40 


i.e. 


2.3 


1.13 


1.49 


1.3 x 10 34 


4.0 x 10 34 


40 


s.c. 


2.3 


1.13 


1.49 


3.8 x 10 34 


1.1 x 10 35 


60 


i.e. 


1.6 


1.09 


0.88 


5.6 x 10 33 


2.4 x 10 33 


60 


s.c. 


1.6 


1.09 


0.88 


1.6 x 10 34 


6.7 x 10 33 



-14- 



LS 5039 deabsorbed 
i = 20° 



Superior Conjunction 



z fl = 1.0*10 cm 
z_ = 1.5*10 12 cm 



z fl = 2.0*10 cm 
z„ = 2.5*10 12 cm 



z fl = 3.0*10 12 cm 

z fl = 4.0*10 12 cm 

z fl = 5.0*10 12 cm 

z =1.0*10 13 cm 



13 

z„ = 1.5*10 cm 




10 

E [GeV] 



Fig. 2. — Deabsorbed VHE 7-ray spectra of LS 5039 for i = 20° and a range of heights of z of 
the emission region above the compact object. The vertical dashed line indicates the energy 
threshold of the HESS observations. The flat power-laws correspond to the anticipated 
neutrino detection sensitivities of the planned NEMO km 3 detector for a steady point source 
with an underlying power-law spect rum of neutrino number spectral index 2.5 after 1 and 
3 years of data taking, respectively (iDistefand 120061 ) . These are relevant for comparison to 
the deabsorbed photon fluxes for a characteristic ratio of unabsorbed photons to neutrinos 
of ~ 1. 



- 15 - 



5 10 



li 



en 
■- 



fa 

* 



10 



12 



LS 5039 deabsorbed 
i = 40° 
r 



S I S " v. "**" —* - * 

✓ " — 




= 1.0*10 12 cm 
= 1.5*10 12 cm 
= 2.0* 10 12 cm 
= 2.5*10 12 cm 
= 3.0*10 12 cm 
= 4.0* 10 12 cm 
= 5.0*10 12 cm 
= 1.0*10" cm 
= 1.5*10 13 cm 



10' 



10 

E [GeV] 



10^ 



Fig. 3. — Same as Fig. [2} but for i = 40°. 



Table 2. Lower limits on the height of the VHE 7-ray emission site above the compact 

object inferred from Figures [6] and [7J Configurations for which the intrinsic apparent 
isotropic luminosity would always be larger than the available accretion power can not be 

realized and are marked as "forbidden" . 





position 


z™ in (F = 1.02) [10 12 cm] 


z™ in (F = 2) [10 12 cm] 


20 


i.e. 


« 1 


« 1 


20 


s.c. 


< 1 


< 1 


40 


i.e. 


forbidden 


« 1 


40 


s.c. 


2.0 


1.7 


60 


i.e. 


forbidden 


forbidden 


60 


s.c. 


5 


forbidden 



-16- 



-10 



10 Fr~~~- 



LS 5039 deabsorbed 
i = 60° 

! , ' ' ' ' Is 



5 10 



-ii - 



' A ~ ~ ~ - -A 



Superior Conjiinctioir- v 



SB 

- 



to 

* 



Inferior i Conjunction 



10 



12 




: 1.0*10 12 cm 
: 1.5*10 12 cm 
: 2.0*10 12 cm 
: 2.5*10 12 cm 
: 3.0*10 12 cm 
: 4.0*10 12 cm 
: 5.0*10 12 cm 
: 1.0*10 13 cm 
: 1.5*10 13 cm 



10' 



10 

E [GeV] 



10 H 



Fig. 4. — Same as Fig. [2j but for i = 60°. 




Fig. 5. — Deabsorbed, integrated 0.2 - 10 TeV 7-ray fluxes of LS 5039 as a function of height 
Zq of the emission region above the compact object. These numbers would also approximately 
equal to the expected neutrino fluxes in the same energy range. 



-18- 



io 36 t 



: \ 



OJD 
U 



35 



>10 : 



io 34 t 



\Superior Conjunction 



i = 20" 

i = 40° 

■-■ i = 6o°y 



\ 




Limits at Superior Conjunction 



EGRET 



Limits at Inferior Conjunction 



Inferior Conjunction 



10 



12 



10 



13 



z Q [cm] 



Fig. 6. — Inferred apparent isotropic luminosities for LS 5039 (thick curves), compared to 
the luminosity limits from Bondi-Hoyle limited wind accretion (horizontal lines), assuming 
Doppler boosting of the emission corresponding to T = 1.02. Allowed configurations are 
those for which the inferred luminosities are substantially below the respective luminosity 
limits. 



-19- 



10 36 : 



: \ 



OJD 
■- 

,0), 

li 



Limits at Superior Conjunction 
Limits at Inferior Conjunction 



'♦^uperior Conjunction 



35 



i = 20" 

i = 40° 

■-■ i = 60°M 



34 



io r 




Inferior Conjunction 



10 



12 



10 



13 



z Q [cm] 



Fig. 7. — Same as Fig. 6, but for T = 2.